Back to school for the SJF Boys!

Back to school for the SJF Boys!

Education and family are two important components to the SJF philosophy of raising responsible and caring children. The five young men supported by St. Joseph’s Home are learning those lessons in very real ways. All the boys live either with their families or in a foster care situation. This allows them to experience family life and be a part of the larger community. Four of the boys are continuing their academic education, which is provided for by St. Joseph’s. The fifth young man is getting ready to embark on a vocational education, which will give him the foundation to support himself.

Photo of Steevens

Steevens

Steevens, whose mother and father are both deceased, lives with his uncle and attends a school in the neighbor where he lives in the Bon Repos section of Port-au-Prince. He is in ninth grade and his favorite subjects are math and politics. Steevens has big plans for his future with his dream being to someday become a lawyer. For now though, his favorite pastime is playing soccer. He plays on his school’s soccer team.

Gasthy, a member of the St. Joseph Family in Haiti

Gasthy

Gasthy and Ti Ralph are brothers. They share the same mother, but have different fathers. Ti Ralph’s father died when he was young. Both boys live with their mother. Gasthy is in seventh grade. He took the government exams last year and did very well. His mother sells things in the market area and he always helps her transport her wares to and from the market. Gusty dreams of being a professional soccer player, but if that doesn’t work out, he thinks a good plan would be to learn how to install windows and work on a construction crew. Ti Ralph lives with Gasthy and their mother. He has struggled academically and did not pass his academic classes last year. Because he is getting older, the path for Ti Ralph is now to pursue a vocational education so that he can learn a trade to be able to support himself. He is thinking about learning how to install tile. In his free time he likes to sing and play soccer. He also helps his mother in the market.

photo of Wisleme

Wisleme

Wisleme lives with his mother. His father died when he was very young. He is in eighth grade and dreams of going to medical school. He likes to read and play soccer.

Lulu is from a very poor and remote mountain village. He is living in a foster care situation so that he can continue school and be supported by the SJF. He is in sixth grade and does very well in school. He loves to write and dreams of becoming a journalist. He also loves to play the drums and to play basketball.

Photo of Lulu

Lulu

Lulu, Wisleme, Gasthy and Ti Ralph all live in the same area in the mountains just outside of Port-au-Prince. Because they live close to each other, the SJF is able to provide a tutor for them. They meet with the tutor five nights a week to help them with their academic studies. Even though Ti Ralph is no longer attending an academic program, he also attends these sessions to continue his education informally. Because Steevens lives far away from the other boys, he studies on his own and with his classmates.

Besides paying for the tuition for the schools and vocational education for the boys, the SJF, through donations received for the Tree of Life program, is able to help with basic needs for the boys. SJF leadership members are present in their lives and meet with them on a regular basis.

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Hurricane Matthew Relief: Haiti Needs Your Help

Hurricane Matthew Relief: Haiti Needs Your Help

With 125 mph winds, Hurricane Matthew ravaged the country of Haiti, leaving death and destruction in its wake. The extent of the destruction is catastrophic – with some areas experiencing 90% loss, The actual number of deaths (currently nearly 900) will probably never be known.

Thanks to the generosity of our donors, we have been able to fund the construction of buildings that can withstand hurricane force winds. Unfortunately, most Haitians do not have those luxuries. The families of the children who attend Lekòl Sen Trinite live in extremely simple homes – many with dirt floors and tarp walls. They are exceptionally vulnerable. They will need help. The SJF leaders and staff are actively following up with the families to identify needs, and – with your support – these families will receive the help they desperately need.

Because of our partnership with the St. Joseph Family in Haiti, you can feel confident that your donations are going directly to Haitians who are in need of your support. Please, help us help Haitians in need, today.

Hurricane Matthew Relief Fund

Mèsi anpil for your generosity, compassion and support!

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Reginald’s Legacy Story, Part 2

Reginald’s Legacy Story, Part 2

Read Part 1 of Reginald’s Legacy Story.

His trip to the United States was quite the adventure. The first adventure was getting a visa from the United States Consulate and permission to travel for the surgery, which was not easy. There were a lot of firsts, starting with his first plane ride. A few days after he arrived in the US, Reginald celebrated his ninth birthday. He had his first big American-style birthday party. A little boy who lived across the street from his host family invited his entire Cub Scout Pack and they threw Reginald an amazing party. They didn’t speak the same language, but when little boys have soccer balls and Matchbox cars, that is common language enough.

Reginald spent several weeks in the United States for the surgery and recovery. All the time his days were filled with much laughter and fun as he explored, had adventures, and made new friends. He became a great ambassador for the St. Joseph Family and Wings of Hope. He spent time at the schools of his new Cub Scout friends, was featured in several newspaper articles, and brought his exuberance and joy everywhere he went.

But, his Wings of Hope family was never far from his thoughts. As Reginald was showered with gifts while he was in the US, he remembered his friends, and began setting aside some of his toys for them. He asked to buy special gifts for certain friends when he and his host family were out shopping. By the time he returned to Haiti, Reginald had a special gift bag prepared for each and every one of his brothers and sisters at Wings of Hope. The day he arrived back home at Wings of Hope was filled with much celebration and Reginald got to be like Santa Claus and he gave out all the gifts he picked out for his friends.

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Reginald’s Legacy Story, Part 1

Reginald’s Legacy Story, Part 1

Reginald had a hard start to his life. His mother died during labor and the doctors amputated Reginald’s left arm near the shoulder to get him out of the birth canal and save his life.  He was Photo of Reginaldborn prematurely and was small and had health problems. His challenges didn’t stop there. He was also very much alone. With his mother dead, no one in his family stepped up to care for him, or even visit him in the hospital. He was cared for by the hospital staff for several months. There was a woman who often came to the hospital to pray with the patients. After seeing little Reginald there on several of her visits, she began to ask about him. She saw this little baby for more than the disabled and abandoned child that he was. She saw something in him that made her see him as her son. Eventually the woman was able to take Reginald home. He lived with her for several years until tragedy came to little Reginald’s life again when his adoptive mother died. The woman’s neighbors loved Reginald, but none of them could care for him, so he was taken to the Haitian department of social services, who then brought Reginald to Wings of Hope. He was only five-years-old.

Reginald was a happy, adventurous, and energetic little boy. He blended in well to the Wings of Hope family. Because he was physically disabled since birth with the loss of his arm, Reginald learned to cope to be able to do everything he wanted and needed to do with one arm. He was always very independent and worked hard to make up for his missing arm.

“I loved living at Wings,” Reginald said. “I loved playing with cars and spending times with the people who would come to visit us. They would take us to eat at the Baptist Mission. That was fun.”

photo of reginald after his surgeryOne thing he couldn’t get past, however, was the pain that the amputation caused. Because the amputation was not done correctly, as Reginald grew, so did the part of the bone that was left in his upper arm. It protruded through the skin and would cause painful infections. If he bumped it or it got hit with a ball when he was playing, it hurt and tears would roll down his cheeks. Thanks to generous doctors and a hospital in the United States, when he was nine-years-old, Reginald went to the US for some life-changing surgery. The doctors fixed his amputation site so that it would stop hurting and be infection-free, allowing Reginald to run and play without pain.

 

 

Read Part 2 of Reginald’s Legacy Story.

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Wootrod

Wootrod

Hearts with Haiti and the St. Joseph Family are committed to ensuring that the young men who graduate from the Family are supported in their transition into independence. The Timoun Jodi Granmoun Demen (“Children Today, Adults Tomorrow”) program provides these young men with the career counseling and job skills training needed to make this transition smoothly and successfully. Wootrod Joly is a participant in the TJGD program.

My name is wootrod. I am 21 years of age. I recently graduated from St. Joseph’s Home. I am now living at a rental apartment. I’m still going to school. Actually this is my last year in High School, I am looking forward to this school year and also the outcome.

My favorite subjects in school are Physics, and Math, so this school year I am really going to make the effort to have good grades, to be able to move to the next level. The last year of High School is not easy, but I pray that I will make it.

As hobbies, I love to play the guitar and sing. I also take the time to read more, because people do get knowledge through reading, it is an important thing to do. I also like to watch TV.

My big dream for the future is for one day to be a lawyer. But I am also interested in other things such as Accounting. My music career and so on.

I’m excited and thrilled to be able to have a home, an apartment of my own to stay in. To me it is a very big deal, especially when you are living in a country where there’s no job opportunities and the government aid is pretty much down to zero on a scale. To me it’s a blessing.  I thank God for the SJF family for all the support they provided for me in my life. Thank you.

 

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